Date   

the Band ina box project webpage open for all

Andrew Black <willboone@...>
 

Hi all.

i have put all the fakebooks i have up at the
following page.

www.geocities.com/thebiabproject

please take the time to read the purpose and
disclaimer. the message board is not up yet, and i
have not links as of now. but taht will change soon.

if you want me to link to your biab page, let me know
by emailing me at drewblack@alltel.net i look forward
to your feedback. i think we could do some fabulous
things for the community together.

peace.

andrew


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New sequence available for download.

DPRICE8292@...
 

My new sequence of "In The Mood" is now available for download.
It can be found in the "Files" section in the "DavesSeq" folder.
The file Inthmood.zip contains both .MGU & .MID formats.
I used BB10 & PT7 to create it. I hope you enjoy it.
Dave Price<
dprice8292 at aol dot com OR ImMrDave at aol dot com
(dprice8292@aol.com) OR (immrdave@aol.com)


Re: ?Question?

Bob 'Notes' Norton <norton@...>
 

At 06:49 PM 2/17/01 -0500, David Bailey <dhbailey@ix.netcom.com> wrote:
I think you and I agree probably most of the way on this issue, and as
co-dictators we could rewrite the copyright laws to make them fair to
EVERYBODY and not just the big corporations like Hal Leonard, Warner
Brothers, Sony, Bertelsmann, and Disney, then we could abdicate.
And perhaps we could skim a little off the top for ourselves ;-)

But I do like to play devil's advocate to make sure people think about
all the sides of these issues.
And as a practitioner of that school of thought myself, I do appreciate the
"other side of the coin" and it's contribution to a heathy debate very much.



- - - - - - - - -
Bob "Notes" Norton
owner, Norton Music
norton@nortonmusic.com
http://www.nortonmusic.com

Norton Music is the #1 producer of BiaB after-market products in the world!
Featuring Power User Styles, Fake Disks, and Arangement Disks.
PLUS ... PG Music products at up to 20% off ... FREE Midi Files ... links
to MIDI file search pages ... download and print sheet music directly from
the web ... a few jokes to brighten your day ... and more.


Re: ?Question?

Bob 'Notes' Norton <norton@...>
 

At 09:54 AM 2/17/01 -0800, "Kenny Danielson" <kendan@worldnet.att.net> wrote:
OK. That does it! Norton for Congress next election. We definitely
need some reason and logic in Washington. Get yourself ready Bob,
and try not to do anything unseemly in the meantime (on second thought,
that may even help and not hinder a political career).
To prepare for public office I guess I should start by:
(1) soliciting bribes -- oops! -- I mean campaign contributions
(2) soliciting babes -- although I am happily married and faithful, I know
that a proper public image won't tolerate anybody that conservative -- but
I will not take up the cigar habit -- a new leader needs some creativity,
you know -- I hope my wife, Leilani, will understand. -- And after we are
done she will have enough public sympathy to be elected to office -- even
if we both have some kind of ____gate in our past and make millions of
dollars illegally at the expense of the American taxpayers.
(3) soliciting allies -- change my party affiliation -- I am an independent
who usually votes for the person rather than the party, that will never do
-- if the Libertarians and Greenies can't make it, any third party is
doomed. There are too many people who just vote their registered party
(what a pity)
(4) soliciting alibis -- I'll need false witnesses for everything -- I'm
already practicing by repeating the phrase "I am not a crook" with a
straight face
(5) soliciting international allies -- all non US people can start by
depositing millions of dollars in my soon to be opened Cayman Islands bank
account
(6) soliciting national friends -- all US citizens can start by sending by
big bucks to either my campaign fund or that aforementioned Cayman Islands
account (the Caymans are much warmer in the winter that Switzerland)
(7) soliciting personal protection and connections -- don't worry, on my
way out you won't have to beg my pardon, I'll offer it freely
(8) reinstate the "butterfly ballot" in all states and rig the computer
software to send all hanging chads, pregnant chads, double votes, and other
ambiguities to me
(9) The list can go on and on but I think I've wasted enough bandwidth.

And of course, do this all in the name of Truth, Justice, and the American Way

Oh, and AFTER I get all the above perks, I am practicing my final statement

"If nominated, I will not run, if elected, I will not serve."

;-)



Bob "Notes" Norton
norton@nortonmusic.com
http://www.nortonmusic.com


Re: everyone who is asking for my fakebook

Andrew Black <willboone@...>
 

well, as i understand it, as long as im not using it
for profit, its cool. becides, i didnt make any of
these. i got them from other websites i found after
day upon day of searching.

i dont know about you guys.. but i never bought into
that whole "poor poor artist" thing the riaa was
pushing. and near as i can tell, the deal that
napster is getting form BMG is to have a subscription
fee paid to the recording company. not to artists.
and screw production companies. when CDs first came
out they wre 17 bucks. the riaa said they would lower
the price when the CD format became more popular.
well, guess how much a CD costs these days? 17 bucks.
screw the Riaa.:)

have a nice day.



--- David Bailey <dhbailey@ix.netcom.com> wrote:
Be wary of posting on the web song files which
include melodies -- many
of the copyright holders (many of which have
licensed their copyrights
to major corporations such as Hal Leonard or Warner
Brothers) regularly
search the web for unlicensed use of their
copyrighted materials.

At the least you will be ordered to cease and desist
if they find your
site, and at the worst they can go after you for
copyright infringement
(Napster should make us all wary). If they find
wilfull infringement of
copyright, the fine can run as high as $10,000 PER
INCIDENT (that means
per song).

And althought the law does not stipulate this, court
cases (precedent)
have shown that if a copyright holder does not
aggressively protect that
copyright, decisions in their favor result in
smaller settlements.

For those who wish to acquaint themselves better
with the actual facts
of the copyright law here is the URL for the
copyright office:

http://lcweb.loc.gov/copyright/

Don't accept ANY of the copyright advice you get
from a list such as
this one as valid legal advice. When in doubt
consult a copyright
lawyer, or at least read the copyright law. There
are many other
web-sites which offer advice about copyright law.
This one outlines
what are calle "Fair Use" guidelines (when you can
use copyrighted
materials without paying royalties or violating the
law):

http://www.utsystem.edu/ogc/intellectualproperty/copypol2.htm

Some other sites where you can find information is:

http://www.musiclibraryassoc.org/Copyright/copyhome.htm

http://www.mpa.org/



Andrew Black wrote:

i should have realised how many of you would ask.

ive got lots that ive found, and some ive made,
most
all with melodies. i tell you what.. im just
going to
put them up on a webpage. ill do it in a week and
post the url in the list. heh.. i cant possibly
keep
up with all the requests.

peace

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Re: FAKE BOOK

David Bailey <dhbailey@...>
 

This raises the interesting issue: the Hal Leonard books make no
pretense about being off-the-record transcriptions. It would be
interesting to see the original manuscript of songs such as Song For My
Father, to see what Horace Silver originally wrote and then how much he
changed when he recorded it.

The difference between Sher's books and Hal Leonard's is that you get
more songs per dollar with Hal Leonard. You get more accuracy per
dollar with Chuck Sher. You pays your money and you takes your chances.

But then who plays the written notes and changes anyway?



heathw@in-tch.com wrote:


I would like to comment about the Hal Leonard fake books. I do not
personally use them because they are filled with harmonic, melodic, and
rhythmic errors. Using Horace Silver's Song For My Father as an example,
I would challenge anyone to play it (without hearing it first) from the
Hal Leonard fake books. The melody is not even close to the recorded
version and the chords (to my ear) are wrong. Most of the songs in the
book have chords that are incorrect. I am a reseller for Hal Leonard
products and I think that many of their products are great but their
Jazz fake books are terrible. The Sher Music Real Books are much better
and cost about the same. Sher's are more readable and the songs are more
correct, when compared to the recorded versions.
Heath

David Bailey wrote:

Hal Leonard publishes many wonderful fake books, many of which Bob
Norton has put together BIAB accompaniment disks to go along with.

Such books as the Ultimate Jazz Fake Book, the Real Jazz Book,

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dhbailey@ix.netcom.com


Re: ?Question?

David Bailey <dhbailey@...>
 

Bob 'Notes' Norton wrote:
[snip]
Once again, I agree with that part of the law.

If I were "dictator of the USA", I would modify them a little (but please,
don't nominate me for the job, I don't want it).
[snip]

You and me, too! I don't like all the aspects of the copyright laws
myself, I just wanted to present the other side of the coin.

While I do appreciate the royalties I get (meager, but fun to go out to
dinner a couple of times on) I receive each year for my published music,
I, too, don't think 75 years post mortem is a good time. I really feel
the old 28 years with a single 28 year renewal is a goodly amount of
time for something to be copyrighted.

But it did make me think when I heard Eubie Blake being interviewed on
the radio shortly before he died and he said "You know you're getting
old when some of your songs have passed into the public domain!" This
was before the 1978 revision of the copyright laws.

I think you and I agree probably most of the way on this issue, and as
co-dictators we could rewrite the copyright laws to make them fair to
EVERYBODY and not just the big corporations like Hal Leonard, Warner
Brothers, Sony, Bertelsmann, and Disney, then we could abdicate.

But I do like to play devil's advocate to make sure people think about
all the sides of these issues.

Peace,
David



--
David H. Bailey
dhbailey@ix.netcom.com


Re: FAKE BOOK

heathw@...
 

I would like to comment about the Hal Leonard fake books. I do not
personally use them because they are filled with harmonic, melodic, and
rhythmic errors. Using Horace Silver's Song For My Father as an example,
I would challenge anyone to play it (without hearing it first) from the
Hal Leonard fake books. The melody is not even close to the recorded
version and the chords (to my ear) are wrong. Most of the songs in the
book have chords that are incorrect. I am a reseller for Hal Leonard
products and I think that many of their products are great but their
Jazz fake books are terrible. The Sher Music Real Books are much better
and cost about the same. Sher's are more readable and the songs are more
correct, when compared to the recorded versions.
Heath

David Bailey wrote:


Hal Leonard publishes many wonderful fake books, many of which Bob
Norton has put together BIAB accompaniment disks to go along with.

Such books as the Ultimate Jazz Fake Book, the Real Jazz Book,


Re: ?Question?

Kenny Danielson <kendan@...>
 

OK. That does it! Norton for Congress next election. We definitely
need some reason and logic in Washington. Get yourself ready Bob,
and try not to do anything unseemly in the meantime (on second thought,
that may even help and not hinder a political career).

Kenny

----- Original Message -----
From: "Bob 'Notes' Norton" <norton@nortonmusic.com>
To: <Band-in-a-Box@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Saturday, February 17, 2001 9:13 AM
Subject: Re: [Band-in-a-Box] ?Question?


I am not too sure about that. Most patents expire after about 17 years. I
could legally produce an exact replica of a Selmer Mark VI saxophone and
Selmer couldn't do a thing about it. (Of course, the problem would be
making it cost effective at todays prices of materials, even Selmer cannot
do that.)

I suspect that if I reverse engineered the original Coca Cola formula, I
would be free to use it.

I could not use the Coca Cola or the Selmer name, they are trade marks,
and
that comes under a different law.

The Bayer company once held the patent on aspirin, Edison held the patent
on the phonograph, RCA held the patent on the US system of color TV, etc.

etc, etc, etc .....................................................


Re: everyone who is asking for my fakebook

Bob 'Notes' Norton <norton@...>
 

At 08:48 AM 2/17/01 -0500, David Bailey <dhbailey@ix.netcom.com> wrote:

Don't accept ANY of the copyright advice you get from a list such as
this one as valid legal advice.
DEFINITELY. Great advice.

And extend that to any legal advice of any kind. Although the people on the
list probably mean well, only a legal professional can be trusted to
interpret the laws properly. The laws are usually complicated and it takes
a professional to interpret them -- (sometimes I suspect that when lawyers
are elected to office, they make the laws ambiguous to insure themselves
work when they are no longer in office <grin -- just kidding>)

That includes my own posts. I try to make it clear that what I post about
any legal issue is only my opinion, not legal fact. I would never try to
deceive the members of the list, but I can misinterpret the laws and the
advice I receive from my own attorney.


- - - - - - - - -
Bob "Notes" Norton
owner, Norton Music
norton@nortonmusic.com
http://www.nortonmusic.com

Norton Music is the #1 producer of BiaB after-market products in the world!
Featuring Power User Styles, Fake Disks, and Arangement Disks.
PLUS ... PG Music products at up to 20% off ... FREE Midi Files ... links
to MIDI file search pages ... download and print sheet music directly from
the web ... a few jokes to brighten your day ... and more.


Re: ?Question?

Bob 'Notes' Norton <norton@...>
 

At 08:38 AM 2/17/01 -0500, dhbailey@ix.netcom.com wrote:
As for the length of copyright, think of a song (or novel or play or
whatever) as the same sort of THING as the Coca-cola formula.
I am not too sure about that. Most patents expire after about 17 years. I
could legally produce an exact replica of a Selmer Mark VI saxophone and
Selmer couldn't do a thing about it. (Of course, the problem would be
making it cost effective at todays prices of materials, even Selmer cannot
do that.)

I suspect that if I reverse engineered the original Coca Cola formula, I
would be free to use it.

I could not use the Coca Cola or the Selmer name, they are trade marks, and
that comes under a different law.

The Bayer company once held the patent on aspirin, Edison held the patent
on the phonograph, RCA held the patent on the US system of color TV, etc.

Unfortunately the
copyright on the song will eventually run out (75 years after the
songwriter dies), while the coca-cola formula will remain an inheritable
commodity FOREVER.
Unless it is leaked. Patents are only for about 17 years.

Why shouldn't you as a songwriter be able to give your children or
grandchildren income from your invention the same way the inventor of
Coca-cola can? If you had written Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer,
wouldn't you want to be able to leave its royalty income to a grandchild
to guarantee they can afford a college education? And why shouldn't you
be able to do that? And if you write a song like White Christmas at age
25 and then die, leaving behind a spouse and young children? Shouldn't
they be able to gain income from your song? That 75 year length will
guarantee that your spouse will be have some income for life.
There are two sides of every discussion and this is a well done review of
the other side of the story. I also do not feel I expressed myself
completely, resulting in you not understanding my point. I think we agree
on much more than we respectfully disagree on.

So, in my usual verbose way, let me illustrate.

My styles are copyrighted, and the copyright will expire 75 years after I
expire. This particular copyright holder thinks 25 years would be
sufficient. I think that 25 years after I die will be enough. That is more
than the length not including the time I still have left breathing. But
that is merely my opinion, you have no obligation to agree with that.

When Picasso sold a painting, he had the copyright on the painting, and he
got his money for selling the painting. If I am lucky enough to own a
Picasso, I can sell it for much more than he got for it, and his estate
doesn't get a cent of that. If he were still alive, he still wouldn't get a
cent. I can display that Picasso, and even charge people admission to come
see it and Picasso's heirs do not get a cent.

As many museums do, I can purchase the copyrighted works of many living and
dead artists, display them in a gallery, and make a profit from people
wanting to see them without paying a cent to the copyright holder.

Is this not equivalent to playing music written by copyright holders in a
public place where you charge admission? And I don't even go that far with
music.

I agree that selling the sheet music (or equivalent), recording the song
and dispersing the recording, copying the sheet music or recordings of the
music, playing it on TV or in a movie, performing it at a concert, and most
other forms of income derived from the copyright are just, fair and
important. I want to get paid for my creative output, too.

But I do not believe that you should have to pay the writer to perform a
song in a public place where no profit is derived. Once again, that is my
personal opinion.

Perhaps this is why this aspect of the law is so infrequently enforced.

How many
real song-writers have health insurance provided by their employer, or
life insurance?
About as many as the musicians who play that song. As a musician, I do not
have life insurance, nor do I have health insurance, I pay more income tax
than the average person (self employment tax), and I have no employee
vested retirement plan.

Most song-writers live very meager lives with no frills
or extras such as insurance while they are trying to get that first hit
and then continue to turn out hits.
Ditto for musicians.

The copyright law is wonderful if you own copyrights and terrible if you
don't yet you want to use copyrighted materials.
I agree with most aspects of the law and don't think they are terrible.

ASCAP and BMI are merely organizations whose purpose is to make it
easier for copyright holders to ensure they get the income which is
guaranteed in the copyright law, without each copyright holder having to
privately license each and every performance of their works with each
and every potential location.
Exactly. Much like the A F of M, the UAW, etc.

As for the not-for-profit aspect of things, consider this:

Does your electric company cut you a bargain because your house is
not-for-profit?
No but if you run a business, you phone bill, insurance bill, property tax,
checking account, and so many other things are more expensive. So in
essence, the bank, phone company, insurance company etc. are giving you a
bargain because your house is not for profit.

Would your auto dealer give you a rebate on your car purchase because
you are not-for-profit?
Nope, but the auto insurance on a car is much, much more if the car is used
for business.

Sure, these companies DO contribute to true non-profit charities, but
then so do organizations like ASCAP and BMI (schools do NOT have to pay
royalties for performances which are in school as part of the
educational program, such as chorus and band and orchestra concerts).
And delightfully so, it is comes under the fair use laws. I'm glad they are
there.

Bit I don't think that ASCAP and BMI created those laws.

When ASCAP and BMI lost the right to charge restaurants for playing the
radio, they tried to instill a charge for record stores playing the records
so the people can hear before they buy (IMO shooting themselves in the foot).

In fact, if you buy blank CD's that are designated for recording music,
they charge you a copyright fee, in other words, assume you are pirating
music. You could be making your legal back up copy, but you pay royalties
anyway.

That brings up an interesting concept. If you copy a recording on a made
for music CD, and give it to a friend, is it piracy? After all, royalties
were paid to ASCAP and BMI when you bought the blank disk?

And as in many of the license fees charged to club owners, etc. most of the
royalties go to the richest song writers and the struggling song writers
don't get much if any of the money.

I personally am glad for the copyright law because if Cole Porter had
not been able to gain his royalty income from his wonderful music, he
would have had to work as a ditch-digger or burger-flipper or whatever
to support himself, and as we all know who have had to do such jobs,
they are such horrible jobs that they really suppress one's creativity.
The same for Gershwin, John Williams, Lennon and McCartney, you name
them, I say God bless them, give them the income and let them write more
wonderful music!
I agree totally, but I disagree that if I play one of their songs at a
party I should have to pay royalties. I disagree that they should own the
exclusive songs until they have been dead for 75 years.

But being a law abiding citizen, even though I disagree with the laws and
think they have gone a little too far, I will abide by them (I think that
is important).

But when you DO write a song that the people around you want to hear
more, and finally captures a national artist's attention and gets
recorded on a CD which sells a million copies, I can guarantee you that
you will NOT refuse that 7.9cent-per-copy mechanical royalty that is
hard-coded into the copyright law. Let's see now, $0.079x1,000,000 =
$79,000, to say nothing about the additional royalty income you will
gain from ASCAP or BMI performance royalties, along with the additional
royalties from printing the song.
Once again, I agree with that part of the law.

If I were "dictator of the USA", I would modify them a little (but please,
don't nominate me for the job, I don't want it).

Respectfully,


- - - - - - - - -
Bob "Notes" Norton
owner, Norton Music
norton@nortonmusic.com
http://www.nortonmusic.com

Norton Music is the #1 producer of BiaB after-market products in the world!
Featuring Power User Styles, Fake Disks, and Arangement Disks.
PLUS ... PG Music products at up to 20% off ... FREE Midi Files ... links
to MIDI file search pages ... download and print sheet music directly from
the web ... a few jokes to brighten your day ... and more.


Re: FAKE BOOK (Norton)

David Bailey <dhbailey@...>
 

Hal Leonard publishes many wonderful fake books, many of which Bob
Norton has put together BIAB accompaniment disks to go along with.

Such books as the Ultimate Jazz Fake Book, the Real Jazz Book, and
others, which you can purchase in any music store (and many book stores)
but which Norton offers at a discount at his web-site.

So he is NOT involved in the printing of the books, yet you can purchase
the disk/book combination and be ready to go, reading and playing along
with the accompaniment files.

Fake books used to be illegal (some still are) because they were printed
without the permission of the copyright holders, nor were appropriate
royalties paid so the copyright holders lost a lot of money. yet they
were the compilations of music which most working musicians wanted to
use.

So the publishers, around 1980 or so, finally got smart and said "Doh!
If people are buying them and we aren't getting any of the income, why
not publish our own and guarantee that the royalties get paid to the
composers and that we earn some money as well." Hal Leonard has the
most books out, but Warner Brothers and Columbia also have their own
books.



John Birchall wrote:


Band-in-a-Box@yahoogroups.com writes:
What I have done as a compromise is to offer optional printed fake books
that contain the same songs as the fake disks. That way you can open the
book and play along with the BiaB disk.
Hey Bob,
don't understand ... do you mean you can print melodies in a paper Fake
Book but not put them in an electronic .mgu file?

cheers and beers
john p birchall
Bush sax player from Chester.


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Re: everyone who is asking for my fakebook

David Bailey <dhbailey@...>
 

Be wary of posting on the web song files which include melodies -- many
of the copyright holders (many of which have licensed their copyrights
to major corporations such as Hal Leonard or Warner Brothers) regularly
search the web for unlicensed use of their copyrighted materials.

At the least you will be ordered to cease and desist if they find your
site, and at the worst they can go after you for copyright infringement
(Napster should make us all wary). If they find wilfull infringement of
copyright, the fine can run as high as $10,000 PER INCIDENT (that means
per song).

And althought the law does not stipulate this, court cases (precedent)
have shown that if a copyright holder does not aggressively protect that
copyright, decisions in their favor result in smaller settlements.

For those who wish to acquaint themselves better with the actual facts
of the copyright law here is the URL for the copyright office:

http://lcweb.loc.gov/copyright/

Don't accept ANY of the copyright advice you get from a list such as
this one as valid legal advice. When in doubt consult a copyright
lawyer, or at least read the copyright law. There are many other
web-sites which offer advice about copyright law. This one outlines
what are calle "Fair Use" guidelines (when you can use copyrighted
materials without paying royalties or violating the law):

http://www.utsystem.edu/ogc/intellectualproperty/copypol2.htm

Some other sites where you can find information is:

http://www.musiclibraryassoc.org/Copyright/copyhome.htm

http://www.mpa.org/



Andrew Black wrote:


i should have realised how many of you would ask.

ive got lots that ive found, and some ive made, most
all with melodies. i tell you what.. im just going to
put them up on a webpage. ill do it in a week and
post the url in the list. heh.. i cant possibly keep
up with all the requests.

peace

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Re: ?Question?

David Bailey <dhbailey@...>
 

Bob 'Notes' Norton wrote:

At 12:22 AM 2/17/01 +0000, DPRICE8292@AOL.COM wrote:
Does anyone know why companies such as ASCAP & BMI have a monopoly on
the copyright issue? They even seem to have controling authority over
background music for business's played over PA systems.
ASCAP and BMI are essentially like the musician's union, but for
songwriters and publishers.

Since the early days of the printing press, the publishers have controlled
the media. When music started being printed, those same people got control
of the music. In the early days, sheet music sales were the primary way to
disperse music (then Edison invented the phonograph).

I think they have oversteped their boundries.
I do too, but I am not sure where I would draw those boundaries.

Personaly I feel that I as a musician should be free to play any
music I choose. It would be a totaly different matter if I were
taking commercial recordings and duplicating them for resale rather
than creating my own version of a song.
On one hand, I can see a songwriter wanting to make money from his or her
creative output. Especially when some of them don't make very much money at
all.

After all, if I wrote a hit song, I would want to collect money for it.
When somebody sings, plays, records, or does anything else that makes money
with my song, I would want a piece of that. After all, the money wouldn't
be made without the popular songs.

Copyright exists until the songwriter is dead for about 75 years, I think
that is way too long. I believe that the copyright should dissolve when the
author dies or 25 years after the song was copyrighted, whichever comes
last. But the government doesn't agree with me.

But what about a not for profit performance of the song? And who is to say,
what is not for profit. If I bring my guitar to a restaurant and play a
couple of songs for free, doesn't the restaurant profit by my playing those
songs there? They do if one person buys a drink or desert and lingers
longer just to hear me play some music. It gets tricky.

And what about songs so popular that they become part of our culture?

Did you know it is illegal to sing "Happy Birthday" without a license? Ever
wonder why so many restaurants make up their own Happy Birthday song? They
don't want to buy a license to play live music in their restaurant.

I think that when a song becomes so popular and sells so many copies that
almost the entire population of a country knows it by heart, there should
be some provision for at least the non profit use of the song. But once
again, what is non profit?
[snip]

As for the length of copyright, think of a song (or novel or play or
whatever) as the same sort of THING as the Coca-cola formula.

The Coca-cola formula can (and has been) be left to people in a will so
future generations can gain the same high level of income from that
formula (it is a privately held trade secret, as opposed to the publicly
held Coca Cola Company which you can buy stock in). Unfortunately the
copyright on the song will eventually run out (75 years after the
songwriter dies), while the coca-cola formula will remain an inheritable
commodity FOREVER.

Why shouldn't you as a songwriter be able to give your children or
grandchildren income from your invention the same way the inventor of
Coca-cola can? If you had written Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer,
wouldn't you want to be able to leave its royalty income to a grandchild
to guarantee they can afford a college education? And why shouldn't you
be able to do that? And if you write a song like White Christmas at age
25 and then die, leaving behind a spouse and young children? Shouldn't
they be able to gain income from your song? That 75 year length will
guarantee that your spouse will be have some income for life. How many
real song-writers have health insurance provided by their employer, or
life insurance? Most song-writers live very meager lives with no frills
or extras such as insurance while they are trying to get that first hit
and then continue to turn out hits.

The copyright law is wonderful if you own copyrights and terrible if you
don't yet you want to use copyrighted materials.

ASCAP and BMI are merely organizations whose purpose is to make it
easier for copyright holders to ensure they get the income which is
guaranteed in the copyright law, without each copyright holder having to
privately license each and every performance of their works with each
and every potential location.

As for the not-for-profit aspect of things, consider this:

Does your electric company cut you a bargain because your house is
not-for-profit?
Would your auto dealer give you a rebate on your car purchase because
you are not-for-profit?

Sure, these companies DO contribute to true non-profit charities, but
then so do organizations like ASCAP and BMI (schools do NOT have to pay
royalties for performances which are in school as part of the
educational program, such as chorus and band and orchestra concerts).

Songs which become the cultural property of a nation should receive the
same protections as do other cultural-institution products -- McDonald's
hamburgers, coca-cola and pepsi, NFL tickets, televisions and radios ALL
cost money and nobody brings up the cultural institution status of these
things as arguments that we should all be able to use them for free. We
STILL have to pay to watch Star Wars.

I personally am glad for the copyright law because if Cole Porter had
not been able to gain his royalty income from his wonderful music, he
would have had to work as a ditch-digger or burger-flipper or whatever
to support himself, and as we all know who have had to do such jobs,
they are such horrible jobs that they really suppress one's creativity.
The same for Gershwin, John Williams, Lennon and McCartney, you name
them, I say God bless them, give them the income and let them write more
wonderful music!

If you don't like having to pay royalties for copyrighted materials,
there is a VERY simple solution:

Write your own songs! With Band-in-a-Box's melodist this is easier than
ever, requires no thought and results in some amazingly great tunes.

Then perform them.

But when you DO write a song that the people around you want to hear
more, and finally captures a national artist's attention and gets
recorded on a CD which sells a million copies, I can guarantee you that
you will NOT refuse that 7.9cent-per-copy mechanical royalty that is
hard-coded into the copyright law. Let's see now, $0.079x1,000,000 =
$79,000, to say nothing about the additional royalty income you will
gain from ASCAP or BMI performance royalties, along with the additional
royalties from printing the song.


--
David H. Bailey
dhbailey@ix.netcom.com


Re: Buying software (long)

David Bailey <dhbailey@...>
 

Bob 'Notes' Norton wrote:
[snip]
<OPINION> As I always say to my fellow Mac users, buy software, and buy a
lot of it, even if you don't really need it because the income to software
developers is the only thing that will keep the Mac alive.</OPINION>
[snip]

I don't think this is merely opinion, but an industry-recognized fact:
software drives hardware. The reason the hardware has improved to what
it is today is that the software developers wanted to add bells and
whistles to their programs and the software users wanted to be able to
use the new versions of the software. I have bought my last two
computers (and keep buying new hardware for my new computer) just so I
could run programs I felt I couldn't live without.

So, EVERYBODY should buy software (no matter PC or MAC user). When a
user bypasses several upgrades to a favorite piece of software, the
developer looks at diminished sales for the upgrade and decides not as
many people are using the software anymore and starts to put the
development dollars into other programs.

I read in PCMagazine that computer sales have really slowed down because
for the most part people who will buy a first computer already have one
(sure there are always youngsters coming up who will be buying a first
computer, but those numbers are much smaller than current members of the
computer-using age groups) and so computer makers have to gear their
sales to people who want to upgrade their machines or buy more powerful
computers.

The magazine Computer Shopper has shrunk from a 6-pound 1.5 inch thick
large-format magazine to about the size of PCMagazine, because all the
small computer hardware vendors have gone out of business.

As for computer hardware, this is not such a big deal, other than
reducing lower-cost options for those of us who put together their own
computers and do their own repairing and upgrading, but when this
happens to the software world, EVERYBODY who uses computers suffers.

Several major pieces of software I use (and constantly upgraded) have
gone the way of the dinosaurs because their user base (or perceived user
base -- those who kept purchasing upgrades) shrank to where the income
from an upgrade didn't pay for the development put into that upgrade.

So, don't pirate software, register all your shareware programs that you
keep using beyond the trial period, and buy those upgrades to your major
applications, every year if you can afford it, to keep the software
alive.

I am in terrible fear that my word-processor (WordPerfect) will dry up
soon as Corel is gobbled up by Microsoft (who has invested in a major
share of Corel), and I shall have to migrate to Microsoft Office (gag,
gag, gag, barf) or continue to use older versions of the software.

I don't want that to happen to Band-in-a-Box, which is one of the major
reasons I became a Windows user, when one of their upgrades (I can't
remember which one) worked more easily in Windows3.11 than in DOS.

Remember what happened to live music performances when people started
buying good-quality LPs where they could hear their favorite groups
playing perfectly in the comfort of their own homes. Far fewer of us
can find work (in my city of 100,000 there are about 7
restaurants/bars/clubs who hire live bands each weekend, and NONE that
have live music every night of the week.) When the people stopped going
out to hear live music, the restaurant/bar/club owners couldn't justify
spending the money on hiring the live musicians.

Don't let the same thing happen to computer platforms like the MAC that
happened to the Atari, the Amiga, the NEXT.

End of my lengthy rant.




--
David H. Bailey
dhbailey@ix.netcom.com


Re(2): Re: FAKE BOOK (Norton)

John Birchall <jpb2@...>
 

Band-in-a-Box@yahoogroups.com writes:
What I have done as a compromise is to offer optional printed fake books
that contain the same songs as the fake disks. That way you can open the
book and play along with the BiaB disk.
Hey Bob,
don't understand ... do you mean you can print melodies in a paper Fake
Book but not put them in an electronic .mgu file?


cheers and beers
john p birchall
Bush sax player from Chester.


Re: ?Question?

Bob 'Notes' Norton <norton@...>
 

At 12:22 AM 2/17/01 +0000, DPRICE8292@AOL.COM wrote:
Does anyone know why companies such as ASCAP & BMI have a monopoly on
the copyright issue? They even seem to have controling authority over
background music for business's played over PA systems.
ASCAP and BMI are essentially like the musician's union, but for
songwriters and publishers.

Since the early days of the printing press, the publishers have controlled
the media. When music started being printed, those same people got control
of the music. In the early days, sheet music sales were the primary way to
disperse music (then Edison invented the phonograph).

I think they have oversteped their boundries.
I do too, but I am not sure where I would draw those boundaries.

Personaly I feel that I as a musician should be free to play any
music I choose. It would be a totaly different matter if I were
taking commercial recordings and duplicating them for resale rather
than creating my own version of a song.
On one hand, I can see a songwriter wanting to make money from his or her
creative output. Especially when some of them don't make very much money at
all.

After all, if I wrote a hit song, I would want to collect money for it.
When somebody sings, plays, records, or does anything else that makes money
with my song, I would want a piece of that. After all, the money wouldn't
be made without the popular songs.

Copyright exists until the songwriter is dead for about 75 years, I think
that is way too long. I believe that the copyright should dissolve when the
author dies or 25 years after the song was copyrighted, whichever comes
last. But the government doesn't agree with me.

But what about a not for profit performance of the song? And who is to say,
what is not for profit. If I bring my guitar to a restaurant and play a
couple of songs for free, doesn't the restaurant profit by my playing those
songs there? They do if one person buys a drink or desert and lingers
longer just to hear me play some music. It gets tricky.

And what about songs so popular that they become part of our culture?

Did you know it is illegal to sing "Happy Birthday" without a license? Ever
wonder why so many restaurants make up their own Happy Birthday song? They
don't want to buy a license to play live music in their restaurant.

I think that when a song becomes so popular and sells so many copies that
almost the entire population of a country knows it by heart, there should
be some provision for at least the non profit use of the song. But once
again, what is non profit?

If you play your music in a night club, the club owner probably has a
license with ASCAP to take care of you.

Until a few years ago, you needed a license to play the radio or TV in your
business because there were copyrighted songs played on the TV and radio.

I know that with my dealings with the Harry Fox agency (they represent the
majority of the publishers in the USA), the main fear the publishers had
about electronic music was that the person who buys a MIDI file could
theoretically could load the music into Encore, Finale and even Cakewalk
and print the music out. The publishers were afraid this would hurt their
very profitable sheet music sales.

In a way, they are right. I am sure that some people would do just that.
Also -- people will photocopy sheet music and songs from a book. When I was
young we used to go into music stores and memorize the chords to popular songs.

On the other hand, it is going to happen anyway, they can't stop it.
Perhaps they should try to license it and go with the flow instead of
trying to fight it.

I am rambling now. Sorry.

The more I think about it, the more questions I ask, and the more questions
I generate.

I'd like for the music to be free, but I want the songwriter to get his or
her just rewards for creating something so popular that everybody wants to
sing it.

I don't have the answer. The electronic age is here, music will travel over
the Internet at the speed of light, people will copy CD's, people will swap
MP3s, and every time they do, it will mean a little less money in the
pocket of the songwriter and the publisher.

There needs to be an alternative way the songwriter (and I suppose the
publishers) can make royalties in this electronic age, and I have searched
in my head for a way, but I cannot think of one.

Perhaps someone else, more creative in that way than I can.




- - - - - - - - -
Bob "Notes" Norton
owner, Norton Music
norton@nortonmusic.com
http://www.nortonmusic.com

Norton Music is the #1 producer of BiaB after-market products in the world!
Featuring Power User Styles, Fake Disks, and Arangement Disks.
PLUS ... PG Music products at up to 20% off ... FREE Midi Files ... links
to MIDI file search pages ... download and print sheet music directly from
the web ... a few jokes to brighten your day ... and more.


everyone who is asking for my fakebook

Andrew Black <willboone@...>
 

i should have realised how many of you would ask.

ive got lots that ive found, and some ive made, most
all with melodies. i tell you what.. im just going to
put them up on a webpage. ill do it in a week and
post the url in the list. heh.. i cant possibly keep
up with all the requests.

peace



__________________________________________________
Do You Yahoo!?
Get personalized email addresses from Yahoo! Mail - only $35
a year! http://personal.mail.yahoo.com/


?Question?

DPRICE8292@...
 

Does anyone know why companies such as ASCAP & BMI have a monopoly on
the copyright issue? They even seem to have controling authority over
background music for business's played over PA systems.
I think they have oversteped their boundries.
Personaly I feel that I as a musician should be free to play any
music I choose. It would be a totaly different matter if I were
taking commercial recordings and duplicating them for resale rather
than creating my own version of a song.

Dave<


Re: Styles and Macs/This is how to change those PC style files to Mac files

Bob 'Notes' Norton <norton@...>
 

At 04:27 PM 2/16/01 +0000, vstguy@yahoo.com wrote:

No offence meant here to your response Bob.
No offence taken.

By simply changing the file type and file creator on those PC Style files
the Mac Band in a Box application
programme can now read those Style files.
Especially for newer Mac versions of BiaB. Older versions had a smaller
limit on the file size for Mac than for PC and I had to write two different
versions of the style, one for PC and a smaller, pared down version for the
Macs.

Now with the introduction of the "Guitar Macros" in version 10 of
Band-in-a-Box, there are styles that will run on PC that won't run on the
Mac until PG Music upgrades the Mac version.


DOS is DOS and Apple is Apple, and I do not say this to create a platform
war. It has been my experience
that both platforms are great providing you have enough money to buy into
the high end of each
platform. Mac's come fully equiped to do high end graphics and audio
recording/playback whereas PC's
have to be custom built to provide high end graphics and audio. Personally I
have found that a high end
Mac will cost as much as a high end PC. Since not too many people or
businesses are doing high end
graphics or midi/audio then a low cost DOS machine is good enough.
I find minor differences between the hardware of better quality PCs and
Macs. The quality is about equal per dollar spent. Sometimes the
peripherals are more expensive for Mac due to the smaller user base.

The only reasons I would buy a Mac are (1) if there was a particular
software application I wanted to use that was only available on the Mac or
that ran better on a Mac (2) if I was doing professional graphics work and
my chosen printer was exclusively Mac or (3) if the recording studio I was
working with was exclusively mac.

Both operating systems are great, each with their own shortcuts and short
comings. I like them both most of the time and hate them equally some of
the time.

The main difference between the two is the available software. There is
much more software available for the PC, it is easier to find, and in many
cases costs less.

As you are fully aware that because Band in a Box was originally a DOS
programme ported over to the
MAC
True, it was originally a DOS program (I HATE DOS), then not ported but
rewritten for Mac and Atari. I don't think there is a DOS version left for
the PC (I could be wrong) and I have heard the Windows version was written
with Visual Basic (I could be wrong about this, too).

we in the MAC world must on the very rare occassion do some corrections
to those DOS Style files.
No big deal for us Macboxers. In fact there are many freebe
application/programmes that can do that
job.
PC Exchange came with my Power Mac and it does the job nicely. My old
Classic II needed Apple File Exchange and Norton Utilities, and it was a
pain in the %*#@.

When it comes to midi files created on other platforms, midi is midi and
they can be played with any Mac
midi player thanks again to the Mac OperatingSystem and of course the same
goes for the PC midi
player.
True, as long as you get that Mac Header information on the MIDI file, you
can play it on the Mac. As you pointed out, that is now an easy thing to
do, but you still have to do it. With PC Exchange, you only have to do it
once and the Mac will remember. This was a great labor saving device and I
thank them for that.

I tend to use whichever computer has the software I want to run. I am lucky
enough to have both a Windows computer and a Mac.

Band-in-a-Box works much better on the PC and always has. Even version 8 on
the Mac has about the same amount of features as version 7 on the PC did.
Writing styles on the Mac for BiaB is not nearly as easy as writing them on
the PC.

Once again that all boils down to the invested hours for the dollars returned.

<OPINION> As I always say to my fellow Mac users, buy software, and buy a
lot of it, even if you don't really need it because the income to software
developers is the only thing that will keep the Mac alive.</OPINION>


- - - - - - - - -
Bob "Notes" Norton
owner, Norton Music
norton@nortonmusic.com
http://www.nortonmusic.com

Norton Music is the #1 producer of BiaB after-market products in the world!
Featuring Power User Styles, Fake Disks, and Arangement Disks.
PLUS ... PG Music products at up to 20% off ... FREE Midi Files ... links
to MIDI file search pages ... download and print sheet music directly from
the web ... a few jokes to brighten your day ... and more.