Date   

Re: Midi Controllers

Michael Payne
 

Thank you much David

On 6 Feb 2021, at 12:34, IAN GRAHAM via groups.io <idgraham=btinternet.com@groups.io> wrote:

Hallo, Michael

With Savihost, the crux is usually to match the version of Savihost to
the coding of the soundfont ie 32 or 62-bit. I find it's that second
part that is often the most difficult to establish - the file ending is
likely to be *.dll regardless, and peripheral information about a given
soundfont is sometimes sketchy. So what I suppose I'm saying is: make
sure you have all the Savihost versions, and try them in turn with the
soundfont until something clicks. Oh, and if none of that works, you
could try Nanohost. (Yes really! Sounds nonsense, but I've been there !)

Isn't technology precise ? !

Good luck

Ian H.

On 06/02/2021 11:37, Michael Payne via groups.io wrote:
Hi David Please can I pick your brain are you familiar with savihost 64 I am trying to re install audio modelling saxophones but no joy Can I use saxophones in bandana box with breath control Thank you Michael
On 6 Feb 2021, at 11:31, David H. Bailey <dhbailey52@comcast.net> wrote:
I agree that 2 octaves is not enough for most musical uses, especially if someone wants to work with composition. 3 full octaves is a must.

I work with notation (mostly Sibelius but I also am fluent in Finale, have worked with MuseScore and I own but don't fully understand Dorico, and I've worked with Notion and Graphire Music Press, too) and in my home studio I have a full 88-key Yamaha keyboard. But (before this pandemic) I would travel often to visit family out of state and would bring my notebook, on which I also have all my notation programs and BIAB installed on. My first travelling keyboard was the Korg NanoKey, which is only 2 octaves. It's very frustrating working with a 2 octave keyboard because one is always having to hit the octave-shift buttons to enter the one or two that might be just above or below the range a person has the keyboard set to. A few months ago I purchased an M-Audio KeystationMiniMk3 2.5 octave keyboard, which is much better. But it's a little frustrating because there are still a few notes where octave-shifting is required. Not as frustrating as the NanoKey 2-octave keyboard, though.

So I found the Arturia KeyStep37 which is still small but has 3 full octaves. It also has a built-in sequencer and an arpeggiator and 4 assignable control knobs. In place of the typical pitch-bend and mod wheels, there are pitch-bend and mod touch-panels where sliding the finger forward and back works the same as the wheels on other keyboards. There are several jacks on the back where various controllers and a sustain pedal can be connected. It's a heavy little keyboard, but my first chance to really work with it yesterday entering notes was a dream because I didn't have to use the octave shift buttons at all and could concentrate on entering the notation.

I also just found (good thing I'm self-employed as a musician so I can take all these things as a business deduction on my taxes) that Korg makes a 3-octave mini-key keyboard also now. So I've ordered the Korg MicroKey237 from Amazon so there are free returns if I don't like it as much as the Arturia. The Korg MicroKey only has the octave-shift buttons and the pitch-bend and mod wheels but no other controller knobs. There are a couple of reasons I might like it better:
1) the Arturia has the USB cable coming out of the middle of the back, so it's not quite as convenient working in a small space since it needs to be a bit away from my notebook. The Korg has the connection coming out of the left end of the keyboard so it will be able to sit flush against the edge of the notebook.
2) for the major reasons I use a keyboard, I don't need all the controller knobs that the Arturia has. The Korg has none.

The Korg MicroKey should be delivered this afternoon. I'll report back after I've had a chance to try it out.

All of these controllers are powered from the USB port. The Arturia has a separate DC power jack so that a person can use an external AC adapter (extra cost!) if one wants to use it simply as a controller attached to a midi module such as the Ketron SD2, which what I plan to experiment with soon.

David


On 2/5/2021 9:10 PM, Bob Lager wrote:
While I agree you probably don't need an 88 key full piano keyboard, based on my experience with a Novation MidiCon keyboard, 2 octaves is probably not enough. BTW, I play clarinet.
On Fri, Feb 5, 2021 at 7:06 PM Arthur Trinchera <a.trinchera@gmail.com <mailto:a.trinchera@gmail.com>> wrote:
Greetings! I'm ready to get a budget priced midi controller and I'm
overwhelmed by the choices.
I also use Ableton so am looking at the Launchkey Mini MK3. I'm not
a piano player and don't need full keyboard. This one is $109 and
has great reviews and works seamlessly with Ableton. I have very
little experience with much Controllers so need help. Any tips,
recommendations or warnings would be appreciated. I would really
like to keep it under $150 it possible.
Thanks in advance,
Arthur (sax and flute player)
PS My main use is to work on making beats and backing tracks to play
sax and flute to and to work on composition.
--
*****
David H. Bailey
dhbailey52@comcast.net
http://www.davidbaileymusicstudio.com












Re: Soft synth TTS-1

IAN GRAHAM
 

Thanks, David.

That sounds very much as if there is a deliberate spoiler in there
somewhere - my experience is that *.dll soundfonts are usually very
tolerant of being copied around, provided the computer recognises them.
i.e. Some need a specific installation, many don't.

Cheers

Ian G.

On 06/02/2021 12:33, David H. Bailey wrote:
On 2/5/2021 10:19 PM, IAN GRAHAM via groups.io wrote:
Can I confirm if I'm understanding this right ? The following summary
is partly what has already been said, and partly based on my own
experience, and what I've read online:

TTS-1 is a fairly elderly but quite respected GM softsynth. It
currently comes bundled with Bandcamp.

What this means is that there is a TTS-1.dll somewhere in the
Bandcamp package.

Can this, therefore, once found, be used independently of Bandcamp
i.e. imported into Biab directly, or made standalone with something
like Savihost or Nanohost ?
The location of the .dll file is C:\Program Files\Cakewalk\Shared
DXi\TTS-1

Once Cakewalk is installed, I tried copying the TTS-1 folder to a
different hard drive, then renamed the folder it was inside of so that
BIAB wouldn't be able to find it in the old location.  Then I had BIAB
search for new plugins.  Apparently the TTS-1 synth only works when it
is in its original installation folder.  There must be other files
that it looks for in specific folders relative to where it is
installed, so it has to remain within the Cakewalk installation.

But for most people it's not a big deal since hard-drives these days
are so cheap and large that installing Cakewalk and not using it other
than to have the TTS-1 soft-synth available for use in BIAB.

I can't say whether it could be used as a standalone in Savihost or
Nanohost, but apparently it can't be used at all if not in the
original installation location.


Re: Midi Controllers

David H. Bailey
 

I have never heard of savihost64 until today when it's been mentioned in two different messages.

I'll have to look into it. But I can't help you with it at the moment.

I hope someone else can chime in with help for you!

Sorry,
David

On 2/6/2021 6:37 AM, Michael Payne via groups.io wrote:
Hi David Please can I pick your brain are you familiar with savihost 64 I am trying to re install audio modelling saxophones but no joy Can I use saxophones in bandana box with breath control Thank you Michael
On 6 Feb 2021, at 11:31, David H. Bailey <dhbailey52@comcast.net> wrote:

I agree that 2 octaves is not enough for most musical uses, especially if someone wants to work with composition. 3 full octaves is a must.

I work with notation (mostly Sibelius but I also am fluent in Finale, have worked with MuseScore and I own but don't fully understand Dorico, and I've worked with Notion and Graphire Music Press, too) and in my home studio I have a full 88-key Yamaha keyboard. But (before this pandemic) I would travel often to visit family out of state and would bring my notebook, on which I also have all my notation programs and BIAB installed on. My first travelling keyboard was the Korg NanoKey, which is only 2 octaves. It's very frustrating working with a 2 octave keyboard because one is always having to hit the octave-shift buttons to enter the one or two that might be just above or below the range a person has the keyboard set to. A few months ago I purchased an M-Audio KeystationMiniMk3 2.5 octave keyboard, which is much better. But it's a little frustrating because there are still a few notes where octave-shifting is required. Not as frustrating as the NanoKey 2-octave keyboard, though.

So I found the Arturia KeyStep37 which is still small but has 3 full octaves. It also has a built-in sequencer and an arpeggiator and 4 assignable control knobs. In place of the typical pitch-bend and mod wheels, there are pitch-bend and mod touch-panels where sliding the finger forward and back works the same as the wheels on other keyboards. There are several jacks on the back where various controllers and a sustain pedal can be connected. It's a heavy little keyboard, but my first chance to really work with it yesterday entering notes was a dream because I didn't have to use the octave shift buttons at all and could concentrate on entering the notation.

I also just found (good thing I'm self-employed as a musician so I can take all these things as a business deduction on my taxes) that Korg makes a 3-octave mini-key keyboard also now. So I've ordered the Korg MicroKey237 from Amazon so there are free returns if I don't like it as much as the Arturia. The Korg MicroKey only has the octave-shift buttons and the pitch-bend and mod wheels but no other controller knobs. There are a couple of reasons I might like it better:
1) the Arturia has the USB cable coming out of the middle of the back, so it's not quite as convenient working in a small space since it needs to be a bit away from my notebook. The Korg has the connection coming out of the left end of the keyboard so it will be able to sit flush against the edge of the notebook.
2) for the major reasons I use a keyboard, I don't need all the controller knobs that the Arturia has. The Korg has none.

The Korg MicroKey should be delivered this afternoon. I'll report back after I've had a chance to try it out.

All of these controllers are powered from the USB port. The Arturia has a separate DC power jack so that a person can use an external AC adapter (extra cost!) if one wants to use it simply as a controller attached to a midi module such as the Ketron SD2, which what I plan to experiment with soon.

David


On 2/5/2021 9:10 PM, Bob Lager wrote:
While I agree you probably don't need an 88 key full piano keyboard, based on my experience with a Novation MidiCon keyboard, 2 octaves is probably not enough. BTW, I play clarinet.
On Fri, Feb 5, 2021 at 7:06 PM Arthur Trinchera <a.trinchera@gmail.com <mailto:a.trinchera@gmail.com>> wrote:
Greetings! I'm ready to get a budget priced midi controller and I'm
overwhelmed by the choices.
I also use Ableton so am looking at the Launchkey Mini MK3. I'm not
a piano player and don't need full keyboard. This one is $109 and
has great reviews and works seamlessly with Ableton. I have very
little experience with much Controllers so need help. Any tips,
recommendations or warnings would be appreciated. I would really
like to keep it under $150 it possible.
Thanks in advance,
Arthur (sax and flute player)
PS My main use is to work on making beats and backing tracks to play
sax and flute to and to work on composition.

--
*****
David H. Bailey
dhbailey52@comcast.net
http://www.davidbaileymusicstudio.com




--
*****
David H. Bailey
dhbailey52@comcast.net
http://www.davidbaileymusicstudio.com


Re: Midi Controllers

IAN GRAHAM
 

Hallo, Michael

With Savihost, the crux is usually to match the version of Savihost to
the coding of the soundfont ie 32 or 62-bit. I find it's that second
part that is often the most difficult to establish - the file ending is
likely to be *.dll regardless, and peripheral information about a given
soundfont is sometimes sketchy. So what I suppose I'm saying is: make
sure you have all the Savihost versions, and try them in turn with the
soundfont  until something clicks. Oh, and if none of that works, you
could try Nanohost. (Yes really! Sounds nonsense, but I've been there !)

Isn't technology precise ? !

Good luck

Ian H.

On 06/02/2021 11:37, Michael Payne via groups.io wrote:
Hi David Please can I pick your brain are you familiar with savihost 64 I am trying to re install audio modelling saxophones but no joy Can I use saxophones in bandana box with breath control Thank you Michael
On 6 Feb 2021, at 11:31, David H. Bailey <dhbailey52@comcast.net> wrote:

I agree that 2 octaves is not enough for most musical uses, especially if someone wants to work with composition. 3 full octaves is a must.

I work with notation (mostly Sibelius but I also am fluent in Finale, have worked with MuseScore and I own but don't fully understand Dorico, and I've worked with Notion and Graphire Music Press, too) and in my home studio I have a full 88-key Yamaha keyboard. But (before this pandemic) I would travel often to visit family out of state and would bring my notebook, on which I also have all my notation programs and BIAB installed on. My first travelling keyboard was the Korg NanoKey, which is only 2 octaves. It's very frustrating working with a 2 octave keyboard because one is always having to hit the octave-shift buttons to enter the one or two that might be just above or below the range a person has the keyboard set to. A few months ago I purchased an M-Audio KeystationMiniMk3 2.5 octave keyboard, which is much better. But it's a little frustrating because there are still a few notes where octave-shifting is required. Not as frustrating as the NanoKey 2-octave keyboard, though.

So I found the Arturia KeyStep37 which is still small but has 3 full octaves. It also has a built-in sequencer and an arpeggiator and 4 assignable control knobs. In place of the typical pitch-bend and mod wheels, there are pitch-bend and mod touch-panels where sliding the finger forward and back works the same as the wheels on other keyboards. There are several jacks on the back where various controllers and a sustain pedal can be connected. It's a heavy little keyboard, but my first chance to really work with it yesterday entering notes was a dream because I didn't have to use the octave shift buttons at all and could concentrate on entering the notation.

I also just found (good thing I'm self-employed as a musician so I can take all these things as a business deduction on my taxes) that Korg makes a 3-octave mini-key keyboard also now. So I've ordered the Korg MicroKey237 from Amazon so there are free returns if I don't like it as much as the Arturia. The Korg MicroKey only has the octave-shift buttons and the pitch-bend and mod wheels but no other controller knobs. There are a couple of reasons I might like it better:
1) the Arturia has the USB cable coming out of the middle of the back, so it's not quite as convenient working in a small space since it needs to be a bit away from my notebook. The Korg has the connection coming out of the left end of the keyboard so it will be able to sit flush against the edge of the notebook.
2) for the major reasons I use a keyboard, I don't need all the controller knobs that the Arturia has. The Korg has none.

The Korg MicroKey should be delivered this afternoon. I'll report back after I've had a chance to try it out.

All of these controllers are powered from the USB port. The Arturia has a separate DC power jack so that a person can use an external AC adapter (extra cost!) if one wants to use it simply as a controller attached to a midi module such as the Ketron SD2, which what I plan to experiment with soon.

David


On 2/5/2021 9:10 PM, Bob Lager wrote:
While I agree you probably don't need an 88 key full piano keyboard, based on my experience with a Novation MidiCon keyboard, 2 octaves is probably not enough. BTW, I play clarinet.
On Fri, Feb 5, 2021 at 7:06 PM Arthur Trinchera <a.trinchera@gmail.com <mailto:a.trinchera@gmail.com>> wrote:
Greetings! I'm ready to get a budget priced midi controller and I'm
overwhelmed by the choices.
I also use Ableton so am looking at the Launchkey Mini MK3. I'm not
a piano player and don't need full keyboard. This one is $109 and
has great reviews and works seamlessly with Ableton. I have very
little experience with much Controllers so need help. Any tips,
recommendations or warnings would be appreciated. I would really
like to keep it under $150 it possible.
Thanks in advance,
Arthur (sax and flute player)
PS My main use is to work on making beats and backing tracks to play
sax and flute to and to work on composition.
--
*****
David H. Bailey
dhbailey52@comcast.net
http://www.davidbaileymusicstudio.com








Re: Soft synth TTS-1

David H. Bailey
 

On 2/5/2021 10:19 PM, IAN GRAHAM via groups.io wrote:
Can I confirm if I'm understanding this right ? The following summary is partly what has already been said, and partly based on my own experience, and what I've read online:
TTS-1 is a fairly elderly but quite respected GM softsynth. It currently comes bundled with Bandcamp.
What this means is that there is a TTS-1.dll somewhere in the Bandcamp package.
Can this, therefore, once found, be used independently of Bandcamp i.e. imported into Biab directly, or made standalone with something like Savihost or Nanohost ?
The location of the .dll file is C:\Program Files\Cakewalk\Shared DXi\TTS-1

Once Cakewalk is installed, I tried copying the TTS-1 folder to a different hard drive, then renamed the folder it was inside of so that BIAB wouldn't be able to find it in the old location. Then I had BIAB search for new plugins. Apparently the TTS-1 synth only works when it is in its original installation folder. There must be other files that it looks for in specific folders relative to where it is installed, so it has to remain within the Cakewalk installation.

But for most people it's not a big deal since hard-drives these days are so cheap and large that installing Cakewalk and not using it other than to have the TTS-1 soft-synth available for use in BIAB.

I can't say whether it could be used as a standalone in Savihost or Nanohost, but apparently it can't be used at all if not in the original installation location.

--
David H. Bailey
dhbailey@davidbaileymusicstudio.com
http://www.davidbaileymusicstudio.com

--
*****
David H. Bailey
dhbailey52@comcast.net
http://www.davidbaileymusicstudio.com


Re: Midi Controllers

Michael Payne
 

Hi David Please can I pick your brain are you familiar with savihost 64 I am trying to re install audio modelling saxophones but no joy Can I use saxophones in bandana box with breath control Thank you Michael

On 6 Feb 2021, at 11:31, David H. Bailey <dhbailey52@comcast.net> wrote:

I agree that 2 octaves is not enough for most musical uses, especially if someone wants to work with composition. 3 full octaves is a must.

I work with notation (mostly Sibelius but I also am fluent in Finale, have worked with MuseScore and I own but don't fully understand Dorico, and I've worked with Notion and Graphire Music Press, too) and in my home studio I have a full 88-key Yamaha keyboard. But (before this pandemic) I would travel often to visit family out of state and would bring my notebook, on which I also have all my notation programs and BIAB installed on. My first travelling keyboard was the Korg NanoKey, which is only 2 octaves. It's very frustrating working with a 2 octave keyboard because one is always having to hit the octave-shift buttons to enter the one or two that might be just above or below the range a person has the keyboard set to. A few months ago I purchased an M-Audio KeystationMiniMk3 2.5 octave keyboard, which is much better. But it's a little frustrating because there are still a few notes where octave-shifting is required. Not as frustrating as the NanoKey 2-octave keyboard, though.

So I found the Arturia KeyStep37 which is still small but has 3 full octaves. It also has a built-in sequencer and an arpeggiator and 4 assignable control knobs. In place of the typical pitch-bend and mod wheels, there are pitch-bend and mod touch-panels where sliding the finger forward and back works the same as the wheels on other keyboards. There are several jacks on the back where various controllers and a sustain pedal can be connected. It's a heavy little keyboard, but my first chance to really work with it yesterday entering notes was a dream because I didn't have to use the octave shift buttons at all and could concentrate on entering the notation.

I also just found (good thing I'm self-employed as a musician so I can take all these things as a business deduction on my taxes) that Korg makes a 3-octave mini-key keyboard also now. So I've ordered the Korg MicroKey237 from Amazon so there are free returns if I don't like it as much as the Arturia. The Korg MicroKey only has the octave-shift buttons and the pitch-bend and mod wheels but no other controller knobs. There are a couple of reasons I might like it better:
1) the Arturia has the USB cable coming out of the middle of the back, so it's not quite as convenient working in a small space since it needs to be a bit away from my notebook. The Korg has the connection coming out of the left end of the keyboard so it will be able to sit flush against the edge of the notebook.
2) for the major reasons I use a keyboard, I don't need all the controller knobs that the Arturia has. The Korg has none.

The Korg MicroKey should be delivered this afternoon. I'll report back after I've had a chance to try it out.

All of these controllers are powered from the USB port. The Arturia has a separate DC power jack so that a person can use an external AC adapter (extra cost!) if one wants to use it simply as a controller attached to a midi module such as the Ketron SD2, which what I plan to experiment with soon.

David


On 2/5/2021 9:10 PM, Bob Lager wrote:
While I agree you probably don't need an 88 key full piano keyboard, based on my experience with a Novation MidiCon keyboard, 2 octaves is probably not enough. BTW, I play clarinet.
On Fri, Feb 5, 2021 at 7:06 PM Arthur Trinchera <a.trinchera@gmail.com <mailto:a.trinchera@gmail.com>> wrote:
Greetings! I'm ready to get a budget priced midi controller and I'm
overwhelmed by the choices.
I also use Ableton so am looking at the Launchkey Mini MK3. I'm not
a piano player and don't need full keyboard. This one is $109 and
has great reviews and works seamlessly with Ableton. I have very
little experience with much Controllers so need help. Any tips,
recommendations or warnings would be appreciated. I would really
like to keep it under $150 it possible.
Thanks in advance,
Arthur (sax and flute player)
PS My main use is to work on making beats and backing tracks to play
sax and flute to and to work on composition.

--
*****
David H. Bailey
dhbailey52@comcast.net
http://www.davidbaileymusicstudio.com





Re: Midi Controllers

David H. Bailey
 

I agree that 2 octaves is not enough for most musical uses, especially if someone wants to work with composition. 3 full octaves is a must.

I work with notation (mostly Sibelius but I also am fluent in Finale, have worked with MuseScore and I own but don't fully understand Dorico, and I've worked with Notion and Graphire Music Press, too) and in my home studio I have a full 88-key Yamaha keyboard. But (before this pandemic) I would travel often to visit family out of state and would bring my notebook, on which I also have all my notation programs and BIAB installed on. My first travelling keyboard was the Korg NanoKey, which is only 2 octaves. It's very frustrating working with a 2 octave keyboard because one is always having to hit the octave-shift buttons to enter the one or two that might be just above or below the range a person has the keyboard set to. A few months ago I purchased an M-Audio KeystationMiniMk3 2.5 octave keyboard, which is much better. But it's a little frustrating because there are still a few notes where octave-shifting is required. Not as frustrating as the NanoKey 2-octave keyboard, though.

So I found the Arturia KeyStep37 which is still small but has 3 full octaves. It also has a built-in sequencer and an arpeggiator and 4 assignable control knobs. In place of the typical pitch-bend and mod wheels, there are pitch-bend and mod touch-panels where sliding the finger forward and back works the same as the wheels on other keyboards. There are several jacks on the back where various controllers and a sustain pedal can be connected. It's a heavy little keyboard, but my first chance to really work with it yesterday entering notes was a dream because I didn't have to use the octave shift buttons at all and could concentrate on entering the notation.

I also just found (good thing I'm self-employed as a musician so I can take all these things as a business deduction on my taxes) that Korg makes a 3-octave mini-key keyboard also now. So I've ordered the Korg MicroKey237 from Amazon so there are free returns if I don't like it as much as the Arturia. The Korg MicroKey only has the octave-shift buttons and the pitch-bend and mod wheels but no other controller knobs. There are a couple of reasons I might like it better:
1) the Arturia has the USB cable coming out of the middle of the back, so it's not quite as convenient working in a small space since it needs to be a bit away from my notebook. The Korg has the connection coming out of the left end of the keyboard so it will be able to sit flush against the edge of the notebook.
2) for the major reasons I use a keyboard, I don't need all the controller knobs that the Arturia has. The Korg has none.

The Korg MicroKey should be delivered this afternoon. I'll report back after I've had a chance to try it out.

All of these controllers are powered from the USB port. The Arturia has a separate DC power jack so that a person can use an external AC adapter (extra cost!) if one wants to use it simply as a controller attached to a midi module such as the Ketron SD2, which what I plan to experiment with soon.

David

On 2/5/2021 9:10 PM, Bob Lager wrote:
While I agree you probably don't need an 88 key full piano keyboard, based on my experience with a Novation MidiCon keyboard, 2 octaves is probably not enough. BTW, I play clarinet.
On Fri, Feb 5, 2021 at 7:06 PM Arthur Trinchera <a.trinchera@gmail.com <mailto:a.trinchera@gmail.com>> wrote:
Greetings! I'm ready to get a budget priced midi controller and I'm
overwhelmed by the choices.
I also use Ableton so am looking at the Launchkey Mini MK3. I'm not
a piano player and don't need full keyboard. This one is $109 and
has great reviews and works seamlessly with Ableton. I have very
little experience with much Controllers so need help. Any tips,
recommendations or warnings would be appreciated. I would really
like to keep it under $150 it possible.
Thanks in advance,
Arthur (sax and flute player)
PS My main use is to work on making beats and backing tracks to play
sax and flute to and to work on composition.
--
*****
David H. Bailey
dhbailey52@comcast.net
http://www.davidbaileymusicstudio.com


Re: Soft synths

royjamie@...
 

Thank you for the inputs on TTS-1 and the ability to use it if Bandlab is uninstalled. On my PC, tts-1 is located in program files/Cakewalk/Shared Dxi/TTS-1
In the tts-1 folder there is an interesting link to   Cakewalk TOC (in the Help folder) which is an online tts-1 manual.  


Re: Link to Cakewalk

Panch
 

I have found that by far the easiest and most intuitive DAW, and I've tried loads, is NCH software's MixPad. I know NCH had some ad bundling issues a few years back but it seems fine now. I used to use cassette and SD card multitrack recorders and to me it has a similar feel.
It's not a full bells and whistles DAW and it's unlikely you'll find many pros espousing it but it's simplicity and intuitiveness supersedes all that for me.


Re: Link to Cakewalk

ALAN SANDEMAN
 

I have been using Cakewalk for years as a comprehensive and sophisticated DAW.  However, like many others such as Cubase, Pro Tools and Logic, it has been around for decades and with each of the virtually annual updates, more features are added in order to remain competitive.  Clearly the result is a better product but an ever increasing level of complexity. 

For relatively new users there are a number of really good YouTube channels to consider subscribing to.  "Home Studio Simplified" and "Creative Sauce" are really great places to start. 

Alan 


On Fri, Feb 5, 2021, 4:10 PM Mr Dave, <immrdave@...> wrote:
I downloaded and installed Cakewalk, but it doesn't seam to be very intuitive to use.
Does anyone have any ideas as to how to learn the program?

Dave



From: main@Band-In-A-Box.groups.io <main@Band-In-A-Box.groups.io> on behalf of rob via groups.io <gibbing08=yahoo.ca@groups.io>
Sent: Friday, February 5, 2021 3:21 PM
To: main@Band-In-A-Box.groups.io <main@Band-In-A-Box.groups.io>
Subject: [Band-In-A-Box] link to cakewalk
 
I don't know if anybody is interested but here is a link for cakewalk"https://www.cakewalk.com/Products"]https://www.cakewalk.com/Products[/a]I dowloaded it yesterday and it's okay but not for me .There are too many bells and whistles that i would never use                                                                                                                                                                          hope this is helpful                     rob !                                                                 
 


Re: Link to Cakewalk

D F Tweedie
 

Hi Arthur ...

Yes, I own the full version of Ableton ... but I haven't opened it (or upgraded) in about 5 years.  I also have Logic and Studio One full versions.

I rationalized getting them so that I could take project files from almost anyone to import into my DAW for mixing.

You've probably heard the old joke that a boat is really a hole in the water you throw money in. I think that could be my computer.

Every DAW has some strengths and some weaknesses. The best DAW is the one you actually learn to use. If money is an object then you have three cost-effective choices: RealBand; Bandlab's Cakewalk (Sonar); or, practically free, Reaper. The last one of these is the one I'd choose for the simple reason that it is constantly being developed and upgraded and has a fantastic user base continuously pushing the limits of what it can accomplish and sharing in a very active community.

If you are on a MAC you can't beat the price and comprehensiveness of Logic.

Among the 'big boys,' StudioOne is a rising star, developed by former development team members from Steinberg's Cubase and Nuendo including the code writer for the Virtual Studio Technology (VST) platform.

I can tell you the reasons I've settled on Pro Tools and Cubase. Pro Tools has been and remains the 'de facto' industry professional standard due to two historical factors and one 'best in class' feature. Digidesign and now Avid developed hardware mixing desks fully integrated with the DAW and also hardware incorporating near zero latency recording capability with their hardware interfaces. Early on the developed automation features integrated into their hardware and Pro Tools that are still unavailable in most competitors. But Pro Tools' premier feature in my view is the fact that all editing can be done in a single edit window (the basic scrolling track window in every DAW) with the use of clever keyboard shortcut features that changes how that window (or tracks there in) are treated. Nearly all other programs have a window for this and a window for that that must constantly be opened and  shut to accomplish basic functions.

Cubase is one such culprit, but it excels in it's MIDI programming functions, a great weakness of Pro Tools. MIDI programming from composition to fully integrating outboard hardware synths are a few of the outstanding and, in my opinion, 'best in class' features on Cubase.

Ableton is a slightly different beast in as much as it has unique compositional work style where one can store musical phrases in a channel/ column  and then set different combinations of them to play across the timeline. It is especially favored by DJs and Remixers as it perfectly lends to adding 'ear candy' to existing tracks. That said, it also records as well as any other DAW.

There's more I could comment upon, but I'm sure I've already said more than enough.

Pro Tools First is a limited teaser program that doesn't make sense to me unless you are seriously considering buying into Pro Tools.

YouTube is full of videos of features and reviews of these various DAWs, many of which offer time limited demos. I suggest you explore to try and find the ones that best fit with what you are hoping to do and then give the ones that seem most suitable a try.

And just to be comprehensive there's also Bitwig, Tracktion, Acid Pro, Fruity Loops, Maschine, MPC, Samplitude, Sequoia ... and the beat goes on.

DF

On Friday, February 5, 2021, 3:32:11 PM PST, Arthur Trinchera <a.trinchera@...> wrote:


Do you use the free Pro Tools? I've tried to get it several times but got sound card errors every time I tried to install but that was on on my older cheap HP laptop. I just got a new beefy pc. Perhaps I should try again. You said you've tried many DAWS. Have you tried Ableton. How would it compare to Pro Tools? I have the lite version that came bundled with Scarlett 2i2.

On Fri, Feb 5, 2021, 2:38 PM D F Tweedie via groups.io <bienpegaito=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
I've used all the DAWs you mention before ultimately settling on Pro Tools and Cubase.

I found Cakewalk's Sonar to be the most convoluted and difficult to learn and soon left for greener pastures. If your goal is to master it you'd be well served to buy some of the 10 Sonar tutorial offerings on Groove3 ... or take a subscription. Here's a link to one offering.


On Friday, February 5, 2021, 1:15:23 PM PST, Steve Thomas <stevet@...> wrote:


It's been my thought for years that Cakewalk is a DAW with capabilities on par with other top DAWs like ProTools (but not as popular), PreSonus, Cubase, Reaper, Ableton, etc. But since it's free now, one might expect it to be simple to use and a bit less powerful, along the lines of Audacity.  But it's a full DAW, and the learning curve is steep.


Steve


On 2/5/2021 3:10 PM, Mr Dave wrote:
I downloaded and installed Cakewalk, but it doesn't seam to be very intuitive to use.
Does anyone have any ideas as to how to learn the program?

Dave



From: main@Band-In-A-Box.groups.io <main@Band-In-A-Box.groups.io> on behalf of rob via groups.io <gibbing08@...>
Sent: Friday, February 5, 2021 3:21 PM
To: main@Band-In-A-Box.groups.io <main@Band-In-A-Box.groups.io>
Subject: [Band-In-A-Box] link to cakewalk
 
I don't know if anybody is interested but here is a link for cakewalk"https://www.cakewalk.com/Products"]https://www.cakewalk.com/Products[/a]I dowloaded it yesterday and it's okay but not for me .There are too many bells and whistles that i would never use                                                                                                                                                                          hope this is helpful                     rob !                                                                 
 
--

 
               Steve Thomas, EMT-P
                Executive Director



Re: Soft synth TTS-1

IAN GRAHAM
 

Can I confirm if I'm understanding this right ? The following summary is partly what has already been said, and partly based on my own experience, and what I've read online:

TTS-1 is a fairly elderly but quite respected GM softsynth. It currently comes bundled with Bandcamp.

What this means is that there is a TTS-1.dll somewhere in the Bandcamp package.

Can this, therefore, once found, be used independently of Bandcamp i.e. imported into Biab directly, or made standalone with something like Savihost or Nanohost ?

Ian G

Wales UK


On 04/02/2021 14:36, royjamie@... wrote:
Good day
Further to David's response re Bandlab.& TTS-1
TTS-1 works well with Bandlab installed. The question I have is: can Bandlab be uninstalled  after TTS-1 is installed and will it continue to function normally? 
Regards


Re: Midi Controllers

Bob Lager
 

While I agree you probably don't need an 88 key full piano keyboard, based on my experience with a Novation MidiCon keyboard, 2 octaves is probably not enough. BTW, I play clarinet.

On Fri, Feb 5, 2021 at 7:06 PM Arthur Trinchera <a.trinchera@...> wrote:
Greetings! I'm ready to get a budget priced midi controller and I'm overwhelmed by the choices.
I also use Ableton so am looking at the Launchkey Mini MK3. I'm not a piano player and don't need full keyboard. This one is $109 and has great reviews and works seamlessly with Ableton. I have very little experience with much Controllers so need help. Any tips, recommendations or warnings would be appreciated. I would really like to keep it under $150 it possible.
Thanks in advance,
Arthur (sax and flute player)

PS My main use is to work on making beats and backing tracks to play sax and flute to and to work on composition.


Re: Link to Cakewalk

Hayward Martin
 

I'm with you on Audacity.  It's easy and it works.  But, not a DAW.


From: main@Band-In-A-Box.groups.io <main@Band-In-A-Box.groups.io> on behalf of Steve Thomas <stevet@...>
Sent: Friday, February 5, 2021 8:42:42 PM
To: main@Band-In-A-Box.groups.io <main@Band-In-A-Box.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [Band-In-A-Box] link to cakewalk
 

I've used ProTools before.  I did find it a bit easier to learn than Cakewalk.  And I have Ableton that came with my Scarlett too, but I never tried it.   DAWs in general have a fairly steep learning curve.  So for most of my general purpose sound recording and editing chores I've stayed with Audacity.  No, it's not a full DAW, but it does most of what I need and it is very easy to learn.

On 2/5/2021 5:31 PM, Arthur Trinchera wrote:
Do you use the free Pro Tools? I've tried to get it several times but got sound card errors every time I tried to install but that was on on my older cheap HP laptop. I just got a new beefy pc. Perhaps I should try again. You said you've tried many DAWS. Have you tried Ableton. How would it compare to Pro Tools? I have the lite version that came bundled with Scarlett 2i2.

On Fri, Feb 5, 2021, 2:38 PM D F Tweedie via groups.io <bienpegaito=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
I've used all the DAWs you mention before ultimately settling on Pro Tools and Cubase.

I found Cakewalk's Sonar to be the most convoluted and difficult to learn and soon left for greener pastures. If your goal is to master it you'd be well served to buy some of the 10 Sonar tutorial offerings on Groove3 ... or take a subscription. Here's a link to one offering.


On Friday, February 5, 2021, 1:15:23 PM PST, Steve Thomas <stevet@...> wrote:


It's been my thought for years that Cakewalk is a DAW with capabilities on par with other top DAWs like ProTools (but not as popular), PreSonus, Cubase, Reaper, Ableton, etc. But since it's free now, one might expect it to be simple to use and a bit less powerful, along the lines of Audacity.  But it's a full DAW, and the learning curve is steep.


Steve


On 2/5/2021 3:10 PM, Mr Dave wrote:
I downloaded and installed Cakewalk, but it doesn't seam to be very intuitive to use.
Does anyone have any ideas as to how to learn the program?

Dave



From: main@Band-In-A-Box.groups.io <main@Band-In-A-Box.groups.io> on behalf of rob via groups.io <gibbing08@...>
Sent: Friday, February 5, 2021 3:21 PM
To: main@Band-In-A-Box.groups.io <main@Band-In-A-Box.groups.io>
Subject: [Band-In-A-Box] link to cakewalk
 
I don't know if anybody is interested but here is a link for cakewalk"https://www.cakewalk.com/Products"]https://www.cakewalk.com/Products[/a]I dowloaded it yesterday and it's okay but not for me .There are too many bells and whistles that i would never use                                                                                                                                                                          hope this is helpful                     rob !                                                                 
 
--

 
               Steve Thomas, EMT-P
                Executive Director


--

 
               Steve Thomas, EMT-P
                Executive Director



Re: Link to Cakewalk

Steve Thomas
 

I've used ProTools before.  I did find it a bit easier to learn than Cakewalk.  And I have Ableton that came with my Scarlett too, but I never tried it.   DAWs in general have a fairly steep learning curve.  So for most of my general purpose sound recording and editing chores I've stayed with Audacity.  No, it's not a full DAW, but it does most of what I need and it is very easy to learn.

On 2/5/2021 5:31 PM, Arthur Trinchera wrote:
Do you use the free Pro Tools? I've tried to get it several times but got sound card errors every time I tried to install but that was on on my older cheap HP laptop. I just got a new beefy pc. Perhaps I should try again. You said you've tried many DAWS. Have you tried Ableton. How would it compare to Pro Tools? I have the lite version that came bundled with Scarlett 2i2.

On Fri, Feb 5, 2021, 2:38 PM D F Tweedie via groups.io <bienpegaito=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
I've used all the DAWs you mention before ultimately settling on Pro Tools and Cubase.

I found Cakewalk's Sonar to be the most convoluted and difficult to learn and soon left for greener pastures. If your goal is to master it you'd be well served to buy some of the 10 Sonar tutorial offerings on Groove3 ... or take a subscription. Here's a link to one offering.


On Friday, February 5, 2021, 1:15:23 PM PST, Steve Thomas <stevet@...> wrote:


It's been my thought for years that Cakewalk is a DAW with capabilities on par with other top DAWs like ProTools (but not as popular), PreSonus, Cubase, Reaper, Ableton, etc. But since it's free now, one might expect it to be simple to use and a bit less powerful, along the lines of Audacity.  But it's a full DAW, and the learning curve is steep.


Steve


On 2/5/2021 3:10 PM, Mr Dave wrote:
I downloaded and installed Cakewalk, but it doesn't seam to be very intuitive to use.
Does anyone have any ideas as to how to learn the program?

Dave



From: main@Band-In-A-Box.groups.io <main@Band-In-A-Box.groups.io> on behalf of rob via groups.io <gibbing08@...>
Sent: Friday, February 5, 2021 3:21 PM
To: main@Band-In-A-Box.groups.io <main@Band-In-A-Box.groups.io>
Subject: [Band-In-A-Box] link to cakewalk
 
I don't know if anybody is interested but here is a link for cakewalk"https://www.cakewalk.com/Products"]https://www.cakewalk.com/Products[/a]I dowloaded it yesterday and it's okay but not for me .There are too many bells and whistles that i would never use                                                                                                                                                                          hope this is helpful                     rob !                                                                 
 
--

 
               Steve Thomas, EMT-P
                Executive Director


--

 
               Steve Thomas, EMT-P
                Executive Director



Re: Midi Controllers

David H. Bailey
 

I've just bought and started using the Arturia KeyStep37 (3 octaves in 22 inches) midi controller. Unfortunately it's $169 but it's very capable and comes with a free version of Ableton Live Lite. I'm using it for entering notes into notation software but will examine its capabilities more in the coming weeks.

There is also the Korg MicroKey37 which sells for about $119 -- I don't know anything about it other than that it also is 3 octaves in about 22 inches. The only controllers it has other than the keyboard is pitch-bend and mod wheels.

There are also 2-and-a-half octave controllers for around $99.

David

On 2/5/2021 7:06 PM, Arthur Trinchera wrote:
Greetings! I'm ready to get a budget priced midi controller and I'm overwhelmed by the choices.
I also use Ableton so am looking at the Launchkey Mini MK3. I'm not a piano player and don't need full keyboard. This one is $109 and has great reviews and works seamlessly with Ableton. I have very little experience with much Controllers so need help. Any tips, recommendations or warnings would be appreciated. I would really like to keep it under $150 it possible.
Thanks in advance,
Arthur (sax and flute player)
PS My main use is to work on making beats and backing tracks to play sax and flute to and to work on composition.
--
*****
David H. Bailey
dhbailey52@comcast.net
http://www.davidbaileymusicstudio.com


Midi Controllers

Arthur Trinchera
 

Greetings! I'm ready to get a budget priced midi controller and I'm overwhelmed by the choices.
I also use Ableton so am looking at the Launchkey Mini MK3. I'm not a piano player and don't need full keyboard. This one is $109 and has great reviews and works seamlessly with Ableton. I have very little experience with much Controllers so need help. Any tips, recommendations or warnings would be appreciated. I would really like to keep it under $150 it possible.
Thanks in advance,
Arthur (sax and flute player)

PS My main use is to work on making beats and backing tracks to play sax and flute to and to work on composition.


Re: Link to Cakewalk

Arthur Trinchera
 

Do you use the free Pro Tools? I've tried to get it several times but got sound card errors every time I tried to install but that was on on my older cheap HP laptop. I just got a new beefy pc. Perhaps I should try again. You said you've tried many DAWS. Have you tried Ableton. How would it compare to Pro Tools? I have the lite version that came bundled with Scarlett 2i2.


On Fri, Feb 5, 2021, 2:38 PM D F Tweedie via groups.io <bienpegaito=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
I've used all the DAWs you mention before ultimately settling on Pro Tools and Cubase.

I found Cakewalk's Sonar to be the most convoluted and difficult to learn and soon left for greener pastures. If your goal is to master it you'd be well served to buy some of the 10 Sonar tutorial offerings on Groove3 ... or take a subscription. Here's a link to one offering.


On Friday, February 5, 2021, 1:15:23 PM PST, Steve Thomas <stevet@...> wrote:


It's been my thought for years that Cakewalk is a DAW with capabilities on par with other top DAWs like ProTools (but not as popular), PreSonus, Cubase, Reaper, Ableton, etc. But since it's free now, one might expect it to be simple to use and a bit less powerful, along the lines of Audacity.  But it's a full DAW, and the learning curve is steep.


Steve


On 2/5/2021 3:10 PM, Mr Dave wrote:
I downloaded and installed Cakewalk, but it doesn't seam to be very intuitive to use.
Does anyone have any ideas as to how to learn the program?

Dave



From: main@Band-In-A-Box.groups.io <main@Band-In-A-Box.groups.io> on behalf of rob via groups.io <gibbing08@...>
Sent: Friday, February 5, 2021 3:21 PM
To: main@Band-In-A-Box.groups.io <main@Band-In-A-Box.groups.io>
Subject: [Band-In-A-Box] link to cakewalk
 
I don't know if anybody is interested but here is a link for cakewalk"https://www.cakewalk.com/Products"]https://www.cakewalk.com/Products[/a]I dowloaded it yesterday and it's okay but not for me .There are too many bells and whistles that i would never use                                                                                                                                                                          hope this is helpful                     rob !                                                                 
 
--

 
               Steve Thomas, EMT-P
                Executive Director



Re: Link to Cakewalk

D F Tweedie
 

I've used all the DAWs you mention before ultimately settling on Pro Tools and Cubase.

I found Cakewalk's Sonar to be the most convoluted and difficult to learn and soon left for greener pastures. If your goal is to master it you'd be well served to buy some of the 10 Sonar tutorial offerings on Groove3 ... or take a subscription. Here's a link to one offering.


On Friday, February 5, 2021, 1:15:23 PM PST, Steve Thomas <stevet@...> wrote:


It's been my thought for years that Cakewalk is a DAW with capabilities on par with other top DAWs like ProTools (but not as popular), PreSonus, Cubase, Reaper, Ableton, etc. But since it's free now, one might expect it to be simple to use and a bit less powerful, along the lines of Audacity.  But it's a full DAW, and the learning curve is steep.


Steve


On 2/5/2021 3:10 PM, Mr Dave wrote:
I downloaded and installed Cakewalk, but it doesn't seam to be very intuitive to use.
Does anyone have any ideas as to how to learn the program?

Dave



From: main@Band-In-A-Box.groups.io <main@Band-In-A-Box.groups.io> on behalf of rob via groups.io <gibbing08@...>
Sent: Friday, February 5, 2021 3:21 PM
To: main@Band-In-A-Box.groups.io <main@Band-In-A-Box.groups.io>
Subject: [Band-In-A-Box] link to cakewalk
 
I don't know if anybody is interested but here is a link for cakewalk"https://www.cakewalk.com/Products"]https://www.cakewalk.com/Products[/a]I dowloaded it yesterday and it's okay but not for me .There are too many bells and whistles that i would never use                                                                                                                                                                          hope this is helpful                     rob !                                                                 
 
--

 
               Steve Thomas, EMT-P
                Executive Director



Re: Link to Cakewalk

Robert Lohse <plumbbobby190@...>
 

I am sure there is a tutorial on you tube

On Friday, February 5, 2021, 3:32:21 PM CST, David H. Bailey <dhbailey52@...> wrote:


On 2/5/2021 4:10 PM, Mr Dave wrote:
> I downloaded and installed Cakewalk, but it doesn't seam to be very
> intuitive to use.
> Does anyone have any ideas as to how to learn the program?
>

Steve is right -- it's a very complex program.  It's a full blown
DigitalAudioWorkstation (DAW) of a level that professional music
producers and recording engineers have used it in the creation of
commercial recordings.  Most of that profession has moved on to
different DAWS but Cakewalk (which used to be called Cakewalk and then
evolved into Sonar in various editions, all developed by Twelve Tone
Systems) still remains very powerful and not intuitive (none of them are!)

You can find youtube videos on cakewalk specifically as well as more
general "here's what you can do with a DAW" sorts of videos, there is a
users manual you can read, and you can probably find used copies of
Sonar-based aftermarket books on ebay (make sure they're books about
Sonar the music program and not discussing submarine warfare), which
should help get you started with Cakewalk.


--
*****
David H. Bailey
dhbailey52@...
http://www.davidbaileymusicstudio.com





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